Posts Tagged ‘MMA

03
Apr
14

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01
Mar
14

This is why I’m hot hot..this is why I’m hot hot..have you listened to the Mim’s song..its a wow. You know there are songs which can instantaneously make you feel upbeat, this is one of them. When I think of upbeat, to motivation to aggression, the name that comes to my mind is an epitome of aggression, Cassius clay AKA Muhammad Ali.

 
Muhammad Ali, the king of trash talks, he used it as a bait to make his opponent loose the temperament before the match. Once he shouted to his opponent sonny Liston, ‘you are smelling like a bear’ and vowed to donate him to the zoo after he beats him. He he…just imagine the level of burn in Liston.
 
 
The above image is not of good quality but it’s self-explanatory, we can see that the signature has changed over the years, and its fascinating how the rules of graphology can be tallied with real life events. His career started in 1960 and by the end of 1963, clay has record of 19-0 with 15 knock outs, and in 1964 he was a contender for heavy weight championship title. You can see the roaring confidence in the signature, the open-top ‘a’ tells us about the trash talks, the above and forward ‘i’ dot signifies the super-confidence. In 1965 he was already a heavyweight champion, and along with the bulging confidence (as ‘i’ dot goes more forward) we can find the hint of spirituality in his signature. There are significant upper loops in ‘a’, ‘d’, & ‘h’ with his surname uplifting from the baseline. The raging bull was finally slowing down as his bouts were going till the 15th round and he knew subconsciously his era was ending and that reflected in the signature (78′ sample),the overall upward movement is gone, spiritual confidence is no where as no upper loops are there. Afterwards he tried to recover his image as a boxer but all is gone by then. His 1981 writing shows although he tried to keep superstar image by the large ‘m’ as earlier but no significant loops, overly stressed middle zone tells us that he has got much involved in his day to day family life.

 

The signature comparison provides so much information, that a 1000 words essay can be written out of it, but lets keep it crisp, so that the crunch doesn’t go from the time I write it, to till the time you read it.

 

Here goes another writing sample of Muhammad Ali

If you are aware of meaning of slants in Handwriting, you can understand that this type of slant is not normal for a person like Muhammad Ali, They are almost like a Type-I hand writing. We have already received the hint of his higher involvement in day to day activities from his last signature, along with that when we see the writing style of ‘I’, which is looking like it got slipped and fell into the floor with top round squeezed to nothing, we can understand that at this stage of life he lacked both spiritual and sporting interest, and was emotionally dependent, involved with the woman in his life.
20
Sep
13

Former Heavyweight Boxer Ken Norton Sr. Passes Away at 70

Nortonali_crop_north

Ken Norton Sr., an International Boxing Hall of Famer who is recognized by pundits as one of the greatest heavyweights in the sport’s history, died Wednesday after a long battle with congestive heart failure.

He was 70 years old.

Norton, whose professional boxing career spanned three decades, died at an Arizona hospital where he had been undergoing rehabilitation due to complications stemming from a stroke, according to the Los Angeles Times’ Claire Noland. Norton had previously overcome two strokes, a heart attack, quadruple bypass surgery and prostate cancer.

Upon hearing of Norton’s passing, many in the sports community reached out to offer their condolences:

The former heavyweight champ is perhaps best known by boxing fans for his trilogy of fights against Muhammad Ali in 1973 and 1976. In the first bout between the two men, held at the San Diego Sports Arena, Norton shocked the world by defeating Ali in a split-decision and breaking his jaw in the process.

Ali would get revenge with controversial victories in their next two fights—one later in 1973 and the other in 1976—but Norton’s victory over Ali in their first fight made him a star. He parlayed that notoriety into a fight against George Foreman in 1974, and a title win over Jerry Quarry in 1975 when Ali had vacated the strap.

 

Though Norton would lose the belt back to Ali in 1976, he would be awarded the WBC championship a year later. Larry Holmes defeated a declining Norton in 1978, ending a championship run that had lasted parts of five years.

Inside the sport of boxing, Norton is well-known for popularizing the cross-armed defense. Rarely seen before Norton employed the tactic to success early in his career—most notably against Ali—multiple other heavyweights began adopting it.

Norton, though, had perfected the craft. Where other fighters who used cross-armed protection often struggled with counterpunching, Norton’s hands were quick enough that he rarely had that problem. He finished with a career record of 42-7-1 with 33 knockout victories. His last fight came in 1981, when he was knocked out by Gerry Cooney at Madison Square Garden.

After Norton’s boxing career, he worked in the entertainment industry as an actor and commentator. He appeared in television shows like The A-Team and Knight Rider during the 1980s.

Norton is survived by his two sons, one of which is former NFL linebacker Ken Norton Jr., who won three Super Bowls over his 13-year career with the Dallas Cowboys and San Francisco 49ers. Norton Jr. is currently the linebackers coach for the Seattle Seahawks.

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Ali vs Norton Chasing each other in yankee

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18
Sep
13

Floyd Mayweather News about his next fight against Khan in the UK

Congrats to the “Pound For Pound King” Floyd Mayweather Jr.

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16
Sep
13

Floyd Mayweather Jr.-Canelo Alvarez gives boxing judge C.J. Ross a black eye

Floyd Mayweather Jr.’s masterful win over Canelo Alvarez is almost ruined by  judge C.J. Ross.

It was a near flawless effort, in and out of the ring.

Floyd  Mayweather Jr. put forth a virtuoso performance against the less experienced  Saul (Canelo) Alvarez on Saturday, hitting and not getting hit. But it wasn’t  just Mayweather’s treatment of Alvarez that was so notable. Golden Boy  Promotions orchestrated one of the more ambitious and successful advertising  campaigns for the fight, giving fans a hint of what the future of the sport  could one day hold.

But just as boxing took a step forward, it was dragged back into its murky  past when the judge’s scorecards were announced on Saturday at the MGM Grand.  Only two of the three judges acknowledged Mayweather’s dominance, with C.J.  Ross, a scorer with a checkered past, the lone dissenter.

RELATED:  EASY MONEY! MAYWEATHER DEFEATS ALVAREZ WITH MAJORITY DECISION

Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Justin Bieber can't believe what they're hearing when C.J. Ross' scorecard is announced.

Al Bello/Getty Images

Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Justin  Bieber can’t believe what they’re hearing when C.J. Ross’ scorecard is  announced.

Ross scored the fight a draw at 114-114, deciding that Mayweather, 36, had  only won six of the 12 rounds. The other two judges scored it for Mayweather:  116-112 (Dave Moretti) and 117-111 (Craig Metcalfe), giving the Pound-for-Pound  King a majority decision victory. When Mayweather (45-0, 26 knockouts) heard the  verdict in the ring, he thought someone was pulling his leg.

Even Justin Bieber, who walked Mayweather to the ring beforehand, looked  upset. Ross scored four of the final five rounds for Alvarez.

“I thought it was a joke,” Mayweather told an ESPN television reporter  shortly after the bout. Earlier in the ring he said: “I’m not in control of the  judges. I’m a little in shock but everything is a learning experience.”

RELATED:  JUSTIN BIEBER, LIL WAYNE ESCORT FLOYD MAYWEATHER JR. TO BOXING  RING

Judge C.J. Ross (r.) originally raises suspicions during the Timothy Bradley-Manny Pacquiao fight.

Jeff Bottari/Getty Images

Judge C.J. Ross (r.) originally  raises suspicions during the Timothy Bradley-Manny Pacquiao fight.

Golden Boy CEO Richard Schaefer, who promotes Alvarez, called Ross’  scorecard a “disgrace.”

“She hurt the game,” said Floyd Mayweather Sr., the father and trainer for  Floyd Jr. “For the biggest fight in the world in the history of boxing- you know  what everyone is saying? Boxing is crooked. It’s crooked.”

On a night when the public was finally turning its attention to a sport that  has mostly lived on the margins, fans got a taste of why so many have turned  their backs on it in recent years: because of the head-scratching decisions by  either corrupt or incompetent judges that continue to mar big fights.

RELATED:  FANS ON SIDE OF ALVAREZ, NOT MAYWEATHER, DURING WEIGH-IN

Floyd Mayweather Jr. puts on a boxing clinic against Canelo Alvarez.

Eric Jamison/AP

Floyd Mayweather Jr. puts on a boxing  clinic against Canelo Alvarez.

“The judge C.J. Ross should be investigated had some money on the fight”  Nets point guard Deron Williams posted on his Twitter account.

Many wondered aloud how Ross got the assignment to judge the biggest fight  of the year. Ross is the same judge that awarded a controversial split decision  victory to Timothy Bradley against Manny Pacquiao last year when most observers  thought Pacquiao did enough to win. In most sports, it’s the best officials who  get to referee the most important events, based on their previous performances.  But that doesn’t always happen in boxing, said Showtime boxing chief, Stephen  Espinoza. No one from the Nevada State Athletic Commission was immediately  available for comment after the fight.

“That’s one area where the sport really needs to improve,” Espinoza said of  the judging. “Other major sports such as the NFL, such as in college basketball  use their best officials for their biggest events. And I think that’s something  that boxing should incorporate and I really don’t see that being taken into  account. We dodged a bullet in a sense because in a closer fight, you’d hate for  [Ross’ scorecard]to be the deciding factor.”

Schaefer suggested the Nevada commission use the money it made on the fight  on seminars to better educate judges. The fight set an all-time live gate record  of $20,003,150 on Saturday.

“The Nevada commission made a lot of money tonight,” Schaefer said  afterward. “I’m sure they can pay for some educational seminars for some of the  officials. I would call that putting the money to good use. I respect the  commission. But they’re going to have to live with their mistakes.”

Mabramson@nydailynews.com

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Floyd Mayweather Jr Photo

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15
Nov
11

Muhammad Ali the Great pay respect to Joe Frazier

PHILADELPHIA —  With his championship belt and a pair of gloves draped over his casket, Joe Frazier was going one more round.

The Rev. Jesse Jackson asked mourners to rise, put their hands together and for one last time “show your love” for the former heavyweight champion.

Muhammad Ali obliged.

Wearing a dark suit and sunglasses, a frail and trembling Ali rose from his seat and vigorously clapped for “Smokin’ Joe,” the fighter who handed Ali his first loss.

Ali was among the nearly 4,000 people who packed the Enon Tabernacle Baptist Church for a two-hour “joyful celebration” of Frazier’s life. He died last week of liver cancer; he was 67. Also attending were former heavyweight champion Larry Holmes and promoter Don King.

His body ravaged by Parkinson’s disease, Ali was accompanied by members of his family and wife, Lonnie, who rubbed his back while he was seated and held his hands as he entered and left the church.

Jackson delivered a stirring eulogy, describing Frazier as someone who “came from segregation, degradation and disgrace to amazing grace.”

“Tell them Rocky was not a champion. Joe Frazier was,” he said, referring to the hometown character from the boxing movie, “Rocky,” and whose statue stands at the base of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. “Tell them Rocky is fictitious, Joe was reality. Rocky’s fists are frozen in stone. Joe’s fists are smokin’. Rocky never faced Ali or Holmes or Foreman. Rocky never tasted his own blood. Champions are made in the ring not in the movies. There deserves to be a statue of Joe Frazier in downtown Philadelphia.”

Mike Tyson, a catch in his voice, sent a videotaped message of condolence as did real estate magnate Donald Trump and actor Mickey Rourke.  Fellow Philadelphia fighter, longtime middleweight champion Bernard Hopkins, also attended. The Rev. Al Sharpton was forced to cancel Monday morning.

“We made history together,” said King, who promoted Ali’s Rumble in the Jungle fight against George Foreman, who was knocked out in the eighth round. “We tried to make America better.”

King, wearing an U.S. flag scarf and clutching a mini-flag, walked over to shake Ali’s hand before the funeral; Holmes greeted “The Greatest” when the service ended — with a 10-bell salute, boxing’s traditional 10-count farewell to its own.

Thousands of mourners turned out Friday and Saturday for a public memorial viewing at the Wells Fargo Center.

Frazier beat Ali, knocking him down and taking a decision in the Fight of the Century at Madison Square Garden in 1971. He would go on to lose two more fights to Ali, including the “Thrilla in Manila” bout.

Frazier was embittered for years by Ali’s taunts and name-calling, though he recently said he had forgiven him.

Their epic trilogy was recalled not only by speakers at the service but those who sent letters to be read at the ceremony. Rourke got the biggest laugh when he joked about Ali getting knocked down by Frazier — with Ali’s friends and family laughing the loudest.

Smokin’ Joe was a small yet ferocious fighter who smothered his opponents with punches, including the devastating left hook he used to end many of his fights early. That’s what he used to drop Ali in the 15th round of their epic bout at MSG.

While that fight is celebrated in boxing lore, Ali and Frazier put on an even better show in their third fight, held in a sweltering arena in Manila as part of Ali’s world tour of fights in 1975. Nearly blinded by Ali’s punches, Frazier still wanted to go out for the 15th round, but was held back by trainer Eddie Futch. The bout, Ali would later say, was the closest thing to death he could imagine.

Frazier won the heavyweight title in 1970 by stopping Jimmy Ellis in the fifth round of their fight at Madison Square Garden. Frazier defended it successfully four times before George Foreman knocked him down six times in the first two rounds to take the title from him in 1973.

Frazier would never be heavyweight champion again.

11
Nov
11

Joe Frazier viewing at the Wells Fargo Center in South Philly on Friday (10AM – 5PM) & Saturday (10AM – 1PM).

Joe Frazier

In addition to the Monday service for Frazier, apparently he will also “lie in state” at the Wells Fargo Center in South Philly on Friday (10AM – 5PM) & Saturday (10AM – 1PM).

Here’s the article excerpt:
“Legendary heavyweight boxer Smokin’ Joe Frazier died Monday after a bout with liver cancer. He was 67.
On Wednesday Frazier’s family released funeral details.
Smokin’ Joe’s body will be lying in state at the Wells Fargo Center Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
“This will be an opportunity for his many fans, supporters and boxing lovers from around the world to pay their final respects to Joe Frazier,” his family said in a release.”
Thanks, Henry Hascup
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